Tech-obsessed humans may have hunched backs, TWO eyelids and smaller brains in just 100 years, scientists claim

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Tech-obsessed humans may have hunched backs, TWO eyelids and smaller brains in just 100 years, scientists claim



TECHNOLOGY-obsessed humans may have hunched backs, two eyelids and smaller brains in just 100 years from now, scientists claim.
Experts have examined the way technology will affect humans in the near future, suggesting the body’s appearance may change significantly.
7 Scientists predict that tech-obsessed people will have hunched backs 100 years from nowCredit: Maple Holistics
7 Scientists also claim that humans will have a second eyelidCredit: Maple Holistics
7 A smaller brain is something tech-obsessed people may have to deal with, scientists claimCredit: Maple Holistics
Dubbed “Mindy”, the human of 2100 has a hunched back, caused by hours sitting in front of a computer monitor at the office and craning her neck to look at smartphones.
Mindy’s appearance shows bigger neck muscles to compensate for her poor posture.DRAMATIC PHYSICAL APPEARANCE
Her skull appears to look thicker to protect from radiation and a smaller brain that has shrunk from leading a largely sedentary lifestyle.
She also has claw-like hands from gripping her phone much too often.
Caleb Backe, a health and wellness expert at Maple Holistics, said: “Spending hours looking down at your phone strains your neck and throws your spine off balance.
“Sitting in front of the computer at the office for hours on end also means that your torso is pulled out in front of your hips rather than being stacked straight and aligned.”
Overexposure to technology can sometimes come to the detriment of our healthJason O’Brien, ‘Mindy’ creator
Kasun Ratnayake, of the University of Toledo, also said the human body could change to limit the amount of damaging light eyes are expose to, resulting in a second eyelid.
Jason O’Brien, head of TollFreeForwarding.com, which produced the model, described any physical changes to the body as part of the “trade-off” that comes with the many benefits of technology.
He said: “Technology gives us convenience, connectivity, entertainment, and so much more – but there is a trade-off.
“Overexposure to technology can sometimes come to the detriment of our health.”‘MILLENNIALS GROWING HORNS’
This follows claims of millennials growing horns out of their skulls due to excessive smart phone use.
Scientists claim the spikes are a side effect of Brits spending nearly four hours a day gawping at their screens.
Professors at University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia, have seen an increasing number in young people with the bony growths at the bottom of their skulls.
The 3cm spikes are known as enlarged external occipital protuberances or EEOPs.
The shocking discovery was made when Dr David Shahar and Associate Professor Mark Sayers were examining more than 200 x-rays of people of all different ages.
They found that nearly half of those ages between 18 and 30-years-old had developed the growths.
Intrigued by their findings, further testing and MRI scans ruled out genetics or injury as the cause.
This is not the first time that these abnormalities have been found in humans.
They were first discussed in the 1800s and were rare, but science boffs believe that our screen time is the blame for them becoming far more common.
Hours spent scrolling could be putting so much strain on lesser used parts of the body that the body parts actually change.
Why are computers bad for our health?Long hours staring at computers for work can damage eyes due to a lack of blinking, experts have warned.
People naturally blink 20 times per minute — but the rate drops to between one and three times when concentrating on a screen.
This can lead to dry eyes, causing strain, blurred vision and headaches.
A survey found that more than half the nation spends the working week in front of a monitor, with the typical office worker viewing a display for more than 5½ hours a day.
Eighty-eight per cent of those said their eyes suffered as a result.
Headaches have affected more than one third and one in five has experienced blurred or disturbed vision.
The survey, by Hycosan & Optase Eye Care, found that 36 per cent could not avoid looking at a display for a day — and two in five could not recall their last screen-free day.
More than half of those quizzed also said that office lighting and air conditioning had a negative effect on eyes.

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According to research revealed last year, the average person spends 24 hours every week staring at their screens.
That works out to be around three-and-a-half hours a week.
On average, people check their phones every 12 minutes, according to Ofcom.
7 Tech model Mindy has claw-like hands from gripping her phone much too oftenCredit: Maple Holistics
7 Some of the dramatic changes scientists claim tech-obsessed people might face later onCredit: Maple Holistics
7 Scientists in Australia have seen an increasing number in young people with the bony growths at the bottom of their skullsCredit: Nature Scientific Reports
7 Hours spent scrolling could be putting so much strain on lesser used parts of the body that the body parts actually changeCredit: Nature Scientific Reports

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