Scammers target Tesco shoppers with texts claiming they have a ‘package waiting’

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Scammers target Tesco shoppers with texts claiming they have a 'package waiting'



SCAMMERS are trying to trick Tesco shoppers into handing over their bank details with fake text messages.
The texts claim to be from the supermarket and say that there is a “package waiting” for them.
1 Tesco shoppers are being targeted by scammersCredit: Getty – Contributor
The messages seem to be playing on a similar Tesco scam we’ve seen that claims shoppers have won a prize for a fake competition.
It says that the person receiving the text has taken “3rd place in our Tesco draw”.
The message then asks customers to check and confirm the package by clicking on a hyperlink that takes you through to a website that looks like it’s run by the supermarket.
But in reality, the website is actually one owned by scammers.

@Tesco Hi, I have received 3 reminders from these numbers: 43754, 43898 and 38448 stating I won something in your draw which I believe it’s a scam. Could you look into this please? Thanks pic.twitter.com/BW3rG6UH4r— Tolúlopé Dairó (@DTEE2011) June 28, 2019

You’ll be asked to fill in a form including your personal details, such as your name and address, before “revealing your gift”.
You are also asked to hand over your bank details to pay a £2 delivery charge but actually the fraudsters can use the information to hack your account.
Shoppers have reported that the text messages are sent from different phone numbers, including 43754, 43898 and 38448.
Some of the text messages even use the receiver’s name to make them seem more believable.
The text messages are likely to have been sent to random phone numbers, not just Tesco shoppers. This is called phishing.
Scammers fire off fake URL links to as many people as possible in the hope that someone will believe it and click on it.
How to spot a fake message or emailIF you’ve received an email or text message claiming to be from your bank or a retailer, then these are the things you should look out for:

Your bank or the retailer will always address a customer by name
They will never ask a customer for their PIN, password or full memorable information
The bank would never ask a customer to click on a link in an email or text message that takes you to a page which asks you for your username, password or any other information
They would never ask a customer to email or text them PINs, card details or passwords
Customers should not click on any links in emails if they have concerns
Customers are encouraged to call their bank if they have any concerns about an email they have received

The supermarket’s social media team has confirmed that the messages are actually a scam and is warning shoppers not to fall for the nasty trick.
“It looks like you have received a phishing text,” a Tesco employee replied to an anxious customer on Twitter.
“May I suggest you take a screen shot of the text and send an e-mail to phishing@uk.tesco.com, once you’ve done that, please delete the text and do not respond to it.”
Customers who’ve received a dodgy-looking text can also report it to the supermarket’s customer service team on 0800 505555.
Last week, we revealed how scammers are targeting Facebook users with a fake up to 90 per cent off designer labels including Ralph Lauren, The North Face and Ray-Ban.
ExclusiveSCAM WATCH Watch out for fake Facebook posts promising Adidas and Nike ‘clearance sales’ SCAM ALERT Police warn about ‘worst scam ever’ over letters saying bank cards could combust CLASS ACT Mystery mime artist who ‘conned carnival goers out of £105’ hands over cash CARD CON Holidaymakers warned about card cloning scam in top summer holiday destinations MRS ‘MCMAFIA’ PLEA Wife of jailed banker says £15.5m Harrods shopping trip ‘isn’t a crime’
Police also recently shared a warning about the “worst scam ever” as customers receive letters saying bank cards could spontaneously combust.
Holidaymakers have also been warned about a card cloning scam in top summer holiday destinations.
And fake litter wardens are trying to swindle locals out of £150 in cash fines.
Man jumps onto car bonnet in one of the worst cash-for-crash scams caught on dashcam

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