Frequent night-time loo visits are leaving millions of Brits sleep deprived – and costing the economy £4.5bn a year

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Frequent night-time loo visits are leaving millions of Brits sleep deprived – and costing the economy £4.5bn a year



FREQUENT night-time loo visits are leaving millions of Brits sleep deprived – and costing the economy £4.5 billion a year.
Research reveals around 5.7 million working-age adults in the UK suffer from nocturia, needing to pee at least twice nightly.
Getty – Contributor Night-time loo visits are leaving millions of Brits sleep deprived and costing the economy £4.5 billion a year
Experts estimate the impact on their health means they do seven days less work annually than unaffected Brits.
The main triggers for the bladder condition include ageing, hormonal changes and prostate issues.
Overall, 14 per cent of Brits are affected.
The NHS recommends affected adults should drink less before bedtime and ditch caffeine.
But medics said their findings were a “wake-up” call – and called on GPs and bosses to do more to help sufferers.
Lead researcher Marco Hafner, from RAND Europe, said : “Doctors and health practitioners often overlook nocturia as a potential health problem associated with sleep loss, and patients can delay reporting the condition until it becomes unbearable and substantially affects their wellbeing.LOWER LIFE SATISFACTION
“Given the substantial economic implications of untreated nocturia, this should be a ‘wake-up’ call …of the importance of identifying and treating nocturia.”
Brits who have to wake up nightly to pee also suffer from lower life satisfaction and work engagement.
The study used workplace survey data collected by Vitality UK.
Many cases of nocturia are caused by an enlarged prostate pushing pressing into the bladder and blocking the urethra, the vessel through which it empties.
Earlier research found a shot of booze up the bum could help the two millions affected fellas get a better night’s sleep.
The jab helped to shrink enlarged prostates by a third — slashing the need for night-time loo visits by half.
Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: “Getting a good night’s sleep is one of the more important things we can do for our overall health and wellbeing – it goes without saying that without a decent amount of sleep, people will be less productive and more lethargic whilst they are awake.
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“Nocturia – having to get up frequently during the night to pass urine – can occur for a number of reasons.
“Maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding or reducing alcohol and caffeine intake and keeping fit can help prevent or delay onset of the causes of the condition.
“Several non-surgical interventions can also help manage symptoms.”
This is the whopping amount Brits spend every year just to use the toilet in public places

 

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