Header Ads

British Prime Minister Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn push for last votes on last day of election campaigning

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May meets with a butcher as she visits London’s biggest meat market, June 7, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
British Prime Minister Theresa May and her main opposition rival, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, are touring the country on the final day of campaigning in a last push for general election votes.
May started the day with a stop in London and will proceed to visit the South Coast, Norfolk, Nottinghamshire and the West Midlands.
The premier was met with a chorus of boos and shouts of "vote Labour" as she visited London’s biggest meat market in the early hours of Wednesday.
The PM’s core message focuses on the exit from the European Union, the reason she called the June 8 election late in April. She argues that resources previously dedicated to EU projects would deliver "huge benefits" across the UK.
But in recent weeks, May has seen her popularity slide as the political debate shifted from Brexit to domestic policy in the wake of three terrorist attacks since March all involving assailants who were known to the authorities.
Corbyn has called on May to resign for reducing the number of police officers during her six years as interior minister. 
With formal Brexit talks due to start on June 19, May is hoping to sweep up supporters from the Independence Party as well as taking some seats from Labour.
"Give me your backing to lead Britain, give me the authority to speak for Britain, strengthen my hand as I fight for Britain," the Conservative leader urged voters on Tuesday in Stoke-on-Trent.
Despite being seen as an unlikely leader, Corbyn has gained momentum in the polls and regularly attracts big crowds to his rallies.
Britain's opposition Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, speaks at a rally ahead of the forthcoming general election, in Glasgow, June 7, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)
Corbyn’s opposition party has gained a boost since the prime minister released the Conservatives' manifesto on May 18, outlining elderly care costs which the media mocked as the "dementia tax."
May was subsequently forced to backtrack on capping the costs, sparking criticism that she is an unreliable leader.
Speaking at a campaign rally in Birmingham on Tuesday evening, Corbyn said May had triggered the general election promising strong and stable government, adding, "they don't say that very often now, do they?
"They just imagined everything was going to be all over by 8 June," he said.
A poll published Tuesday by the group Survation, showed that May's one-time 20-point lead over Labour has dropped to just over a single percentage point -- 41.6 percent to 40.4 percent.

No comments