British Prime Minister Theresa May says will rip up human rights laws in terror fight

June 6, 2017 10:30 pm

British Prime Minister

British Prime Minister Theresa May says she will rip up human rights laws that impede her government’s fight against terrorism in the wake of deadly terrorist attacks in Manchester and London.
The premier made the comments about her security agenda on Tuesday as the June 8 general election was approaching.
On Saturday, terror on and near the London Bridge left at least seven people dead and wounded nearly 50 others.

People hold placards and stand beside flowers on June 6, 2017, south of London Bridge in London, during a gathering following the June 3 terror attack. (Photos by AFP)

May said she would seek “longer prison sentences for people convicted of terrorist offences. I mean making it easier for the authorities to deport foreign terror suspects to their own countries.”
The Conservative leader also vowed to do more to “restrict the freedom and the movements of terrorist suspects when we have enough evidence to know they present a threat, but not enough evidence to prosecute them in full in court.”
“And if human rights laws stop us from doing it, we will change those laws so we can do it.”
According to The Guardian, the proposed measures could include “further curfews, restrictions on association with other known extremists, controls on where they can travel and limits on access to communication devices.”
The Tory leader’s comments came as her lead was narrowing against Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for the upcoming election.

British Prime Minister Theresa May steps off the bus to visit the Cheltenham Science Festival in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, south-west England on June 6, 2017. 

“We need to look at how the terror threat is evolving, the way that terrorism is breeding terrorism and the increased tempo of attacks. We have had three horrific attacks and we have foiled five others. The tempo is there in a way we haven’t seen before,” May said. “We will look at how the processes were followed, what they did. They will want to be looking at that because they will want to learn lessons for the future, if there are those lessons to be learned.”
She also praised the police for security service for their “good job in foiling a number of plots – just five in the last three months, and a significant number in the last few years as well.”

A woman kisses the hands of people at a gathering  on June 6, 2017, in London, following the June 3 London terror attack.

Three knife-wielding assailants drove a hired van into pedestrians on London Bridge Saturday and stabbed others nearby in an attack initially praised and subsequently claimed by the Daesh Takfiri group.
On May 22, a Takfiri suicide bomber with an improvised explosion device targeted a concert arena in Manchester as thousands of young people streamed from the venue.
Twenty-three people, including children, were killed and nearly 120 others were injured, 23 critically.
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