Brexit: Andrea Leadsom emerges as new pro-Brexit choice for UK PM

July 2, 2016 9:00 pm

This handout photo shows British Conservative Party politician . (AFP file photo)

British pro- lawmaker,
Andrea Leadsom, emerges as the closest rival to frontrunner candidate
Theresa May in a race to succeed Prime Minister David Cameron.

The
junior minister, who has not been very well known to most voters,
attracted support from some lawmakers and became second-favorite to
succeed Cameron, British media reported on Saturday.
Leadsom won
the backing of former Environment Secretary Owen Paterson and former
Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith on Friday.
The 53-year-old lawmaker is expected to announce her plan for the leadership on Monday.
Leadsom, who campaigned to leave the European Union, told the Daily Telegraph
on Saturday that the next prime minister must be a Brexit supporter
rather than someone “who is reluctantly following the wishes of the
people.”
“I genuinely believe that if we want to make a go of it, then we need somebody who believes in it,” she added.
Leadsom
now leads Justice Secretary Michael Gove, who failed to land
significant support from fellow Conservative lawmakers, but stays behind
Interior Minister Theresa May, who supported the “Remain” campaign.

British
Interior Minister Theresa May announced her bid to succeed Prime
Minister David Cameron on Thursday, June 30, 2016. © AFPBritain
voted to leave the after 43 years of membership in a referendum last
week. The vote, dubbed Brexit, prompted Cameron to announce his
resignation and leave exit negotiations to a successor.
While
the political leaders of the EU call on Britain to start exit
negotiations as soon as possible, Cameron refuses to involve in any
negotiation and says he would leave it to the next prime minister.
Meanwhile on
Saturday, thousands of people took to the streets of London to protest
the exit vote. An organizer of the rally said people “can prevent Brexit
by refusing to accept the referendum as the final say.”
The exit vote has also divided the , with Scotland and Northern Ireland demanding to remain in the union.

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