The storm system that spawned deadly tornadoes in Texas brought heavy
snow, ice and blustery winds to several states in the country’s
midsection, as well as heavy rain in already water-logged areas where
flooding has already been blamed for more than a dozen deaths.
And
with parts of northern England waterlogged after storms Desmond and
Eva, Britain was braced for severe gales and more heavy rain. Storm
Frank was forecast to batter western parts of the UK from this morning
into tomorrow.
More than 2100 flights across the US were
cancelled yesterday – more than half of them at Chicago’s two main
airports – and 3700 were delayed, according to flight-tracking service
FlightAware.
Snow from New Mexico to the Midwest, plus flooding
in Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois, piled on top of earlier wild
across the country.

Highways turned icy and treacherous in New Mexico, and
Oklahoma declared a state of emergency after blizzard conditions
affected parts of the state and heavy rains fell.
In Britain, up
to 150mm of rainfall is predicted to hit areas of Cumbria and south-west
Scotland, while up to 40mm is expected over Northern Ireland and west
Scotland.
Prime Minister David Cameron was heckled as he visited
flood-hit northern communities amid claims that southern communities
would not have been left defenceless.
Judith Blake, the council
leader in Leeds, called the deluge in her city a “preventable disaster”
which would not have happened had flood defence schemes not been
shelved.

A shop owner writes a message to customers  after flooding,  in Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire. Photo / AP
A shop owner writes a message to customers after flooding, in Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire. Photo / AP

Blake said she would be imposing “as much pressure on as
possible to redress the balance and get the funding situation equalised
so the North get its fair share”.
Cameron said “we spend more per
head on flood defences in the North of England than we do in the South
of England, and here in Yorkshire we are almost trebling the amount we
will be spending in the current parliament”.
Experts have estimated that economic losses caused by the flooding that has devastated parts of Britain could top 1.5 billion.