Uninterrupted Electricity Supply Impossible In Nigeria Now – Minister of Power

February 11, 2015 6:40 am
“Nobody in the world can provide 24/7 electricity everywhere in
”, adding that 160,000 megawatts would be needed to do that. The
current capacity is 4,500 megawatts.
“The cost of providing
electricity per megawatt on average is $2billion. To get to where South
Africa is, you will need about $3.2trillion (about N672trillion). Where
will you find that kind of money?” he asked.

Minister of Power, , has said that it is impossible
to provide constant, uninterrupted electricity to everyone in Nigeria in
the near future.
Speaking with newsmen in London over the weekend, the minister said:

“Nobody in the world can provide 24/7 electricity everywhere in
Nigeria”, adding that 160,000 megawatts would be needed to do that. The
current capacity is 4,500 megawatts.
“The cost of providing
electricity per megawatt on average is $2billion. To get to where South
Africa is, you will need about $3.2trillion (about N672trillion). Where
will you find that kind of money?” he asked.

In addition to the huge amount of money involved,
Prof. Nebo said power projects also take time to come to fruition,
stressing that it takes between four and six years to deliver the power
projects.
“You don’t buy these things off the shelves. It takes time to design, study, procure, manufacture, install and commission”,
he said, but explained that the government had done so much on
generation capacity, transmission and distribution infrastructure, which
are key necessities in power supply.

He said 20,000 megawatts was needed to ensure constant power supply to
major cities in the country that have been connected to the national
grid, but said it would require a lot of resources and time to achieve
the feat.

The minister further said the current facilities and infrastructure on
the ground had the capacity to provide more than 5,000 megawatts in the
country, but lamented that some saboteurs were bent on ensuring that the
target is not achieved by vandalising gas pipelines on a regular basis.

He emphasised that the demand for electricity in Nigeria is so huge that “no
matter what you do, once electricity gets to a place, people acquire
more facilities, buy refrigerators and air-conditioners, and before you
know it, what you think is enough for everyone has to be shared by so
many people”.

He also said solar power could go a long way in solving Nigeria’s power
problems, especially in the rural areas, disclosing that three
communities, including Durumi in the suburbs of Abuja, have enjoyed 13
months of uninterrupted electricity since the start of the pilot scheme
in December 2013.

Source

If this is the case, how then has all the money spent on power been spent?

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