Jihadi John, is the World’s most wanted ISIS terrorist

February 27, 2015 12:05 pm
First picture of the face of the
younger, normal, happy looking
schoolboy who has now turned into the reviled, disgusting
executioner,
, who has publicly beheaded many foreign nationals and now
the face of ISIS. Originally born in Kuwait before moving to UK at 6,
his name is Mohammed Emwazi. He embraced British life, playing football
in
the affluent streets of West London while supporting Manchester United.
Neighbours recalled a polite, quietly spoken boy who was studious at his
Church of England school, where he was the only Muslim pupil in his
class. The son of a Kuwaiti minicab driver, young Emwazi arrived in
Britain speaking only a few words of English, and appeared more
interested in football than in Islam. It was only after he won a place studying computing at the University of Westminster that his behaviour began to change.

He was on a UK terror watch list, but managed to flee to Syria in 2012. Now, he’s known around the world as the
notorious Islamic State murderer who has shocked the world with his blood lust.

The
university has since been linked with several proponents of radical
Islam, and Emwazi appeared to have fallen under their sway. 

He
began attending different mosques and was known to associate with Bilal
el-Berjawi, who was killed by a drone strike in Somalia three years
ago.

In August
2009, after his graduation, Emwazi flew to Tanzania in East Africa with
friends and told authorities they were going on a wildlife safari.

But
the group was refused entry and put on a plane to the Netherlands,
where Emwazi later claimed he was questioned by an MI5 agent called
Nick.

The
British officer accused him of planning to travel to Somalia to join
the militant group Al Shabaab, he said, and said MI5 had been watching
him.

Emwazi
denied the accusation – bragging that he would not take a designer
Rocawear sweater in his luggage if he was planning to join Somalian
rebels.
In emails to
the campaign group Cage, Emwazi said: ‘He [Nick] knew everything about
me; where I lived, what I did, the people I hanged around with.’

‘Nick’ then tried to recruit the 21-year-old, Emwazi claimed, and threatened him when he refused to cooperate.

Emwazi
said the officer told him: ‘You’re going to have a lot of
trouble…You’re going to be known…You’re going to be followed…Life will
be harder for you.’

On
his return to Britain, Emwazi said his family told him they had been
‘visited’, and he claimed a woman he had been planning to marry broke
off their engagement because her family had also been contacted and were
scared.

According
to Emwazi, his family then began planning for him to travel to Kuwait
to get him away from the ‘harassment’ he had suffered in Britain and he
went to work for a computer programming company in the emirate.

In his
account to Cage, he said security officers continued to visit his family
and he decided to make a ‘new life’ in Kuwait, where he was once again
planning to marry.

But
following a visit back to Britain in 2010 he said he was stopped at
Heathrow Airport and barred from flying back to Kuwait, and claimed that
he was interrogated by an aggressive officer who threw him against a
wall, grabbed his beard and strangled him.

Emwazi made an official complaint to the Independent Police Complaints Commission, saying he had been assaulted by the officer.

But
court documents show he was also arrested himself later that year and
charged with possessing five stolen bicycles, although he was later
acquitted at court. 

Incensed by the decision to stop him returning to Kuwait, Emwazi told Cage he felt ‘like a prisoner’ in London.

He
said he was ‘a person imprisoned and controlled by security service
men, stopping me from living my new life in my birthplace and country,
Kuwait.’

Friends
told the Washington Post he was already talking wildly about travelling
to Syria, where the uprising against Bashar al Assad was beginning in
earnest.

But
he also applied for work in Saudi Arabia, taking a course to teach
English and applying for work at language centres in the kingdom.

Rejected
by those, his father suggested he change his name in a bid to avoid any
block from British authorities, and Cage said he changed his name by
deed poll in 2013 to become Mohammed al-Ayan.

He
made one more attempt to fly back to Kuwait that year but was barred
from leaving Britain again and disappeared from his parents’ home a week
later.

His
parents reported him missing after three days but claimed it was four
months before police arrived at their home and said they had information
he was in Syria. 

His
father, 51, told police they were wrong and that his son was in Turkey
helping refugees from Syria, and the family are said to continue to deny
that he is the masked IS executioner. 

Meanwhile,
two British trainee medics who met Jihadi John in Syria said he had a
fearless ‘nothing to lose’ attitude and was always ready for war.

Speaking
anonymously to ITV, they said the killer was unmarried and was probably
picked for the executioner poster boy role because of the way he
handled difficult situations.

One
of them said: ‘He seems like someone with not a lot to lose. There has
been incidents where he has run into checkpoints and he dealt with
people in a careless, gung-ho manner with disregard for his own safety.

Photo/story credit: Mail Online.

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